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1998-1999

Congratulations to Elmer Birney who is the recipient of the Hartley H.T. Jackson Award given by the American Society of Mammalogists at this year's annual meeting. This award was given in recognition of his long and outstanding service to the society.

Congratulations to Anja Brunet (Zoology Graduate Program) who received the Latin American Student Field Research Award from the American Society of Mammalogists at the 1999 annual meeting of the society. The fellowship was established to promote mammalian field research in Latin America by Latin American students.

Congratulations to Elmer Birney and Robert Zink for their award of $3,000 from the State of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for "Identification, distribution, habitat use of masked shrews."

Congratulations to Bob Sikes, who just completed negotiations and signed his contract at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock. He will teach Field Mammalogy at Itasca the first session, then begin at Little Rock in late August.

Gene Wahl was awarded Honorable Mention by the Department of Energy Global Change Education Program in their 1999 Graduate Research Environmental Fellowship (GREF) competition.

Dr. James M. Haynes, EEB alumnus who obtained his Ph.D. in Ecology in 1978, received the New York State Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching for 1999. Dr. Haynes is currently Professor and Coordinator at the Center for Applied Aquatic Science and Aquaculture, Department of Biological Sciences, State University of New York College at Brockport.

Congratulations to Bob Sterner who has been promoted to Professor of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior.

Congratulations to Jay Hatch for his award of $24,169 from the State of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for "Topeka shiner surveys and life history and habitat characterization in Minnesota -- Phase I."

Three of the five CBS student teaching awards for this year were given to EEB graduate students David Heiser, Alison Pearce, and Karyl Whitman. Congratulations!

Congratulations to Robert Sterner for his award of $97,172 for year one of a three-year award from the NSF for "Elemental homeostasis at the individual, guild and ecosystem levels."

Congratulations to Donald Siniff for his award of $97,221 from the NSF for "An examination of genetic patterns and phylogeny of Antartic pack ice seals: A coordinated multinational project."

Congratulations to Anne Pusey and Craig Packer for their award of $100,000 from the NSF for "Determinants of male dominance and reproductive success in wild primates."

Congratulations to James Curtsinger for his award of $1,200,000 from the NIH for the renewal of his previous work on "QTL mapping of longevity genes in Drosophila."

Congratulations to Margaret Davis for her award of $110,000 from the NSF for "Holocene Climate Reconstruction in the Upper Midwest Using Pollen Analogs."

Congratulations to Anna Bosacker and Eli Bridge for having recently been awarded NSF Fellowships, and to Elizabeth Vinson who has been awarded a FLAS fellowship by the Institute for Global Studies to study Kishwahili in Africa this summer.

Congratulations to Regents Professor Margaret Davis for her award of $2,000 from the U.S. Department of the Interior-National Park Service for "Microscopic Charcoal Analysis from Pollen Cores, Isle Royal National Park."

Congratulations to Regents Professor Margaret Davis who has been chosen one of the first eight recipients of the University's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Post-Baccalaureate, Graduate, and Professional Education. As part of the award, she will be inducted into the University's new Academy of Distinguished Teachers.

Congratulations to Richard Phillips who was chosen one of five University recipients of the first annual Mortar Board Outstanding Professor Award by the University of Minnesota chapter of the Mortar Board Senior Honor Society.

Congratulations to Anne Pusey who was named one of the recipients of the 1999 Distinguished McKnight Professorship, which recognizes and rewards the University's most outstanding midcareer faculty. Pusey joins EEB professors Craig Packer and Dave Tilman in this prestigious recognition.

Field ornithologist David Freeland Parmelee died in Las Vegas, Nevada, December 16 of cancer at age 76. He was a faculty member in EEB and director of the Lake Itasca Forestry and Biological Station from 1970 until 1986, then was a professor and curator of ornithology in the Bell Museum of Natural History until his retirement from the U in 1992. He went on to become the research curator of ornithology at the Barrick Museum of Natural History at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and continued his field research, spending time in both the Arctic and Antarctic. He was a member of the Cooper Ornithological Society, the Association of Field Ornithologists, the Colonial Waterbird Society, and the Explorers Club. He was active in the field and in his writing and art until a month before his death. He is survived by his wife, Jean, and daughter, Helen.

Congratulations to Gene Wahl, who won the Geological Society of America's 1998 Outstanding Student Research Award for his dissertation research titled "Holocene Paleoecology and Testing of Climate Model Results in Southern California." This research also earned him a dissertation research grant from the National Science Foundation. Gene also received the American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists' Award for Best Student Paper at the 1998 AASP annual meeting in October, 1998. Gene is advised by Margaret Davis, EEB, and Bill Cunningham, GCB, and is a conservation biology Ph.D. candidate.

Kudos to Timothy Parshall, who won the E.S. Deevey Award for the best student paper in paleoecology at the 1998 Ecological Society of America meeting. His award will be presented at the ESA meeting in 1999. Timothy is advised by Margaret Davis of EEB and is an ecology Ph.D. candidate.

Science Watch, Vol. 9, No. 5, September/October 1998 reported that the University of Minnesota was ranked number 1 in the ecology/environment division in its "Top Ten Tournament". The University's 536 ecology/environment research papers attracted citations at the highest rank, 126% above the world average.