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David Kirkpatrick

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Title

David Kirkpatrick
Associate Professor, Associate Head, and Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development

Department:

Research Lab:


Research in my lab investigates DNA mutation during meiotic recombination and in non-dividing, quiescent cells. Perhaps not too surprisingly given my research interests, my teaching focuses on Genetics. Also, I am very interested in outreach - teaching genetics, and biology in general, to interested parties outside of the College of Biological Sciences. A number of years ago I helped set up the non-majors version of Genetics in order to better serve the University students who were not in CBS. Since that time we have added a non-majors version of Cell Biology, and I am currently working to set up Minors in Biology for non-CBS students. CBS students have benefited enormously from the innovations in teaching and research instituted over the last decade by the faculty now in BTL, and it’s important to share that expertise with the wider University community.

  • Bachelor of Science - Carnegie Mellon University
  • Ph.D. - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Curriculum vitae


DNA Mutation; Meiotic Recombination; Repetitive DNA stability; Quiescent Cell DNA Dynamics

Research statement

The Kirkpatrick lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms controlling DNA stability in cells, especially in cells that have exited the cell cycle and are no longer dividing, and in cells that are undergoing meiosis. Using a novel assay to detect DNA alterations occurring in post-mitotic, non-replicating, quiescent yeast cells, we identified all yeast genes influencing the stability of repetitive minisatellite DNA sequences in quiescent cells. As the vast majority of human cells are post-mitotic, and as we have demonstrated that DNA stability is maintained differently in this class of cells, our experiments are essential to understand the cellular mechanisms leading to human disease onset in non-dividing cells such as neurons, including the initial mutations leading to tumorigenesis.

Research in my lab investigates DNA mutation during meiotic recombination and in non-dividing, quiescent cells. Perhaps not too surprisingly given my research interests, my teaching focuses on Genetics. Also, I am very interested in outreach - teaching genetics, and biology in general, to interested parties outside of the College of Biological Sciences. A number of years ago I helped set up the non-majors version of Genetics in order to better serve the University students who were not in CBS. Since that time we have added a non-majors version of Cell Biology, and I am currently working to set up Minors in Biology for non-CBS students. CBS students have benefited enormously from the innovations in teaching and research instituted over the last decade by the faculty now in BTL, and it’s important to share that expertise with the wider University community.

  • GCD3022 - Undergraduate Genetics for Non-CBS Students
  • Molecular Biology and Society (under development)

Alver, B., Jauert, P.A., Brosnan, L., O’Hehir, M., VanderSluis, B., Myers, C.L., and D.T. Kirkpatrick (2013) A Whole Genome Screen for Minisatellite Stability Genes in Stationary Phase Yeast Cells. G3:Genes|Genomes|Genetics 3: 741-756.

LeClere, A.R., Yang, J.K., and D.T. Kirkpatrick (2013) The Role of CSM3, MRC1 and TOF1 in Minisatellite Stability and Large Loop DNA Repair During Meiosis in Yeast. Fungal Genetics and Biology 50: 33-43.

Alver, B., Kelly, M.K., and D. T. Kirkpatrick (2013) Novel Checkpoint Pathway Organization Promotes Genome Stability in Stationary-Phase Yeast Cells. Molecular & Cellular Biology 33: 457-472.

Kelly, M.K., Brosnan, L., Jauert, P.A., Dunham, M.J., and D.T. Kirkpatrick (2012) Multiple Pathways Regulate Minisatellite Stability During Stationary Phase in Yeast. G3:Genes|Genomes|Genetics 2: 1185-1195.

Legrand, M., Chan, C.L., Jauert, P.A., and D. T. Kirkpatrick (2011) The Contribution of the S-phase Checkpoint Genes MEC1 and SGS1 to Genome Stability Maintenance in Candida albicans. Fungal Genetics & Biology 48: 823-832

Kelly, M.K., Alver, B., and D. T. Kirkpatrick (2011) Minisatellite Alterations in ZRT1 Mutants Occur via RAD52-dependent and RAD52-independent Mechanisms in Quiescent Stationary Phase Yeast Cells. DNA Repair 10: 556-566

Phone Number
612-624-9244
Email Address

dkirkpat@umn.edu

Address
6-140 MCB
420 Washington Avenue SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455