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About CBS Scholarships + Donors

The financial support for CBS undergraduate scholarships comes from the generosity of donors who have provided funds to promote education in the biological sciences through the CBS Annual Giving Scholarships and from those who have created special scholarships to honor the memory of colleagues, friends or family who served as valued members of the University of Minnesota community.

Through these scholarships, we are able to provide recognition and assistance to deserving members of the current student population. Memorial scholarships are special grants that often honor the memory of an individual by seeking to support current students who share the same ideals and interests. The CBS scholarship committee strives each year to support as many deserving students as possible and to select recipients for the memorial scholarships whose attributes and actions resonate with the wishes of the donors.


College of Biological Sciences

CBS Annual Giving Scholarship

The CBS Annual Giving Scholarship provides funding to students in recognition of outstanding academic achievements and in order to encourage them to continue their pursuit of a career in the biological sciences, eventually lending their support to outstanding future CBS students. The funds for this scholarship are made possible by annual gifts from CBS graduates.

CBS Freshman Scholarship

The award recognizes incoming first year students with outstanding achievements in high school. This award is made possible by annual gifts from CBS alumni and friends.

Biological Sciences Alumni Society (BSAS) Freshman Merit Scholarship

The College of Biological Sciences Freshman Scholarship is a one-year award of $1000. The award recognizes incoming first year students with outstanding achievements in high school. This award is made possible by annual gifts from CBS alumni and friends.

Bloomfield-Shapiro Scholarship

Dr. Bloomfield was a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics from 1970-2011, a prominent researcher in molecular biophysics, and served in a variety of leadership roles at the University, including department head, vice provost for research, associate dean and interim dean of the Graduate School, and associate vice president for public engagement. He and Elsa Shapiro created this scholarship to support promising undergraduate students who have financial need. Dr. Shapiro was a faculty member in the Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology in the Division of Pediatric Behavioral Neuroscience, and an adjunct member of the Psychology and Child Psychology departments, from 1974-2014. She developed the program in pediatric neuropsychology at the University. She is an expert on genetic neurodegenerative diseases of children and has been internationally recognized for her work on the  the cognitive and behavioral phenotypes of many disorders.

BSAS Alumni and Friends Scholarship

This scholarship was established by the Biological Sciences Alumni Society to recognize outstanding undergraduate students who demonstrate academic excellence, leadership qualities and a passion for the College of Biological Sciences. Support comes from Board Members, alumni and friends of CBS.

Robert Buck and Cheryl Quinn Scholarship

This scholarship was established by Robert Buck (B.S. Biology, ’82) and Cheryl Quinn (B.S. Biochemistry and Microbiology, ’85). Buck earned a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of London and Quinn earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Illinois and did postdoctoral research at Oxford University. They are both independent consultants. Buck works with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. This scholarship benefits undergraduate students who are academic achievers and have financial need.

Richard Caldecott Award

Richard Caldecott was chief planner of the College of Biological Sciences and became its first dean when the college opened in 1965. Before that, he had gained a national reputation for his research on the effects of radiation on human biology, conducted under the auspices of the Atomic Energy Commission. Caldecott served as dean for nearly 20 years. Like the Rhodes scholarship, the Caldecott award recognizes outstanding achievement in academics, leadership and athletics.

Denneth (Denny) and Joan Dvergsten Scholarship

Denneth received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in education from the University of Minnesota in 1956 and 1971, respectively. He was a distinguished science teacher in the Roseville school district for many years. He was the first president of the Minnesota Science Teachers Association and was selected Minnesota Teacher of the Year in 1975. From 1986 until his retirement in 1991, Denny served as director of outreach for the College of Biological Sciences. Joan graduated from Mankato State University with a degree in elementary education. This scholarship reflects their lifelong, shared commitment to science education in Minnesota. It benefits promising students who are new to the College of Biological Sciences and have financial need.

Elde-Baskin Scholarship in Biology

Robert Elde and Bonnie Baskin are biologists with a long-standing passion for creating access for high quality education in the sciences for all. Elde served as dean of the College of Biological Sciences from 1995 to 2014, as well as the JB Johnston Land Grant Professor of Neuroscience. Baskin was the founder and chief executive officer of two biotechnology companies. The scholarship was established to support a promising undergraduate student entering the College of Biological Sciences who demonstrates high academic ability.

Franklin Enfield Scholarship

This scholarship honors the memory of Franklin Enfield who was a devoted professor of genetics and cell biology from 1960 to 1996. Enfield had a reputation as an effective and dedicated teacher both in the classroom and in the research lab. He also recognized the need to integrate more effectively the contributions of the University into the larger community. This scholarship reflects his interests and values by supporting students who plan to work outside of academia.

Norman Kerr Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship honors the late Norman Kerr, a professor of zoology from 1959 to 1965, and genetics and cell biology from 1965 to 1995. Kerr also served as associate dean of the College of Biological Sciences from 1967 to 1980. This award reflects his dedication to education by supporting students who aspire to be teachers.

Edward B. Lewis Memorial Scholarship

Nobel Laureate Edward B. Lewis earned a B.S. in biostatistics from the University of Minnesota in 1939 and a Ph.D. in genetics from the California Institute of Technology in 1942. He served on the Cal Tech faculty for his entire career. Known for establishing the field of developmental genetics, Lewis received the 1995 Noble Prize in Medicine for his work on fruit fly genetics. His scholarship supports undergraduate students with strong academic ability and an interest in research.

Michael Loveless Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship was created in honor of Michael Loveless, an outstanding undergraduate student who exemplified the ideals of student leadership and academics. His parents established this scholarship after his untimely death in 1986. It supports students with outstanding academic performance who are committed to community service.

Harold Paul and Mary Sisson Dey Morris Scholarship

Emory Morris established this scholarship to support undergraduates interested in nutrition science and to honor his parents. His father, Harold Paul Morris (Ph.D. Biochemistry, '30), had a distinguished career with the USDA, FDA and National Cancer Institute. His mother, Mary Sisson Dey Morris, earned an M.S. degree in nutrition and had a career as a teacher. Now retired, Emory Morris was a chemistry professor for the State University of New York at Brockport for 42 years.

Kien Nguyen and Julie Warren Scholarship

This scholarship was established by alumnus Kien Nguyen (B.S. Biology ’90) and his wife, Julie Warren, who met at the University of Minnesota. They created the scholarship to express their gratitude for scholarships Kien received while attending the College of Biological Sciences. Kien, who earned a Ph.D. in neuroscience at the University of Colorado and an MBA from Columbia University, is an executive for a Texas biotechnology company. He and Julie have two children, Joshua and Zac.

Claudia Neuhauser Scholarship Fund in Biology

Claudia is vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Minnesota - Rochester and is former head of CBS' Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior. This scholarship supports undergraduate students who represent the first generation in their families to attend college.

Venkateswarlu Pothapragada and Family Undergraduate Scholarship

Venkateswarlu Pothapragada earned a Ph.D. in physiological chemistry and microbiology from the University of Minnesota in 1962, and became a research scientist for 3M. His family scholarship benefits new students at the College of Biological Sciences who show academic promise.

Douglas Pratt Undergraduate Scholarship

Physicians Mary Kemen and Brian Randall created this scholarship to honor Douglas Pratt, who died in 2008. Pratt was a professor at the College of Biological Sciences for three decades. He headed the botany department (now the Department of Plant Biology) and its graduate programs for many years and led development of the college’s environmental sciences curriculum. Pratt was Kemen’s mentor while she was an undergraduate working in his lab. This scholarship is awarded to outstanding students with leadership experience.

Richard and Ethel Rapp Scholarship

This scholarship is for NEW, fulltime undergraduate students in CBS who show academic promise and financial need. Preference will be given to students with an interest in medicine, medical research or neuroscience. Special consideration will be given to veterans or participants in ROTC.

Red-Shouldered Hawk Scholarship

Max and Linda Quaas established the Red-Shouldered Hawk Scholarship at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories in 2013. Max and Linda both grew up in Iowa and graduated from the University of Iowa. Max did his family practice residency at Fairview St. Mary's in Minneapolis as part of the University of Minnesota family medicine program. Linda taught elementary schoool. Max was introduced to Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories by Professor Muir Eaton, who taught Ornithology at Itasca during the summer session. Max became involved with the station through Director David Biesboer.

Clare and Jerome Ritter Scholarship

Alumna Clare Ritter (M.S. Biochemistry ’72), who became a research scientist, and her husband, attorney Jerome Ritter, established this scholarship to assist new undergraduate students. The award supports efforts to diversify the student body of the college and goes to high-potential students from greater Minnesota.

Murray Rosenberg Memorial Award

This award was established by Pearl Rosenberg, psychologist and former assistant dean of the University of Minnesota Medical School, in honor of her husband Murray Rosenberg, physician and professor of genetics and cell biology from 1963 to 1993, and an advocate for human rights. The fund assists students who conduct research or provide humanitarian service in socially or economically depressed parts of the world or the United States.

Monica Tsang and James Weatherbee Merit Scholarship

This scholarship was established by R&D Systems, a subsidiary of Techne Corporation, to honor the outstanding contributions of longtime employees Monica Tsang and James Weatherbee. Tsang, who earned a Ph.D. in biology from Brandeis University in 1975, was vice president of Techne Corporation in Minneapolis until she retired in 2007 to care for her husband. Weatherbee was also a vice president for R&D Systems/Techne Corp. Tsang and Weatherbee were co-founders of R&D Systems Biotechnology Division. The scholarship supports undergraduate students who have shown a commitment to academic achievement in biology.

Carol and Wayne Pletcher Fellowship

Carol Pletcher earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry at the College of Biological Sciences in 1979 and went on to a successful career at Cargill, where she ultimately became a vice president. Wayne Pletcher spent most of his career working as a research scientist and executive for 3M. He has also been active as a leader in Minnesota’s biotechnology community. Their fellowship supports outstanding female students pursing doctoral studies at the college.


Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics

Wallace D. Armstrong and Venkateswarlu Pothapragada Fellowship

Alumnus Venkateswarlu Pothapragada (Ph.D. Physiological Chemistry '62) established this fellowship to honor his advisor, Wallace Armstrong, a biochemistry professor from 1934 to 1974, who did pioneering research on fluoride. After earning a Ph.D. and remaining in Armstrong's laboratory for several years, Dr. V, as friends call him, went to 3M, where he spend 32 years as a research scientist. The fellowship supports graduate students in biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics, preferably students with ties to India.

Cargill Fellowship in Systems Biology of Human Metabolism

The Cargill Chair and Fellowships in Systems Biology of Human Metabolism were funded by a $1 million gift from Cargill in 2006, which provided $750,000 for the chair and $250,000 in matching funds from the 21st Century Graduate Fellowship Endowment, which is supported by income from Professor Robert Vince's discovery of Carbovir for HIV-AIDS.

Danielson Blake Family Scholarship

CBS Professor Paul Siliciano's passion for teaching biochemistry to undergraduates inspired this scholarship which was started by his mother-in-law, Lenore Blake Danielson, who earned a B.A. in geography from the College of Liberal Arts in 1957. Her husband, Robert Danielson, who earned B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Minnesota in 1953, 1955 and 1958, respectively, was a professor at Princeton University until his untimely death in 1976. Paul's wife, Deanna Siliciano, is the Danielsons' daughter. The Danielson Blake Family Scholarship provides need-based support to undergraduate students interested in biochemistry.

David Grantham Burbee Memorial Scholarship

Clark Burbee (Ph.D. Agricultural Economics ’72) established this award to honor the memory of his son David, who earned a B.S. in biochemistry from CBS in 1977. David went on to Cornell University and had a successful career in biochemistry and human genetics. He died in 2005 at the age of 55. This scholarship supports undergraduate biochemistry students.

Stanley Dagley Memorial Scholarship

Stanley Dagley was a Regents Professor of Biochemistry from 1966 to 1987. He pioneered the use of bacteria to degrade agricultural and industrial toxins in the environment. Dagley received his degrees from Oxford University, the University of London and the University of Leeds, and studied microbial biochemistry with Nobel Laureate Sir Cyril Hinshelwood. As one of CBS’ original faculty members, he helped to chart the college’s course in biochemistry. He trained many outstanding doctoral students and attracted postdoctoral fellows and visiting faculty from universities in England. This scholarship was established when he died in 1988 to honor his memory and enable very promising students to conduct independent research projects over the summer.

Juliamarie Andreen Grilly Undergraduate Research Scholarship in Molecular Biology

The Grilly scholarship supports undergraduate students engaged in molecular biology research. It was established by Edward Grilly to honor the memory of his wife, Juliamarie, who earned a microbiology degree from the University in 1946 and spent her career as a research scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

LaVell Henderson Award

This scholarship honors the memory of LaVell Henderson, chair of the biochemistry department from 1963 to 1974 and associate dean of the college from 1979 to 1984. As a researcher, Henderson made important contributions to nutritional science and biochemistry, and was an active member of the American Institute of Nutrition, serving as president from 1977 to 1978. The award supports students who are majoring in biochemistry and have made outstanding achievements in research.

Wayne and Sadie Luchsinger Scholarship

Wayne and Sadie Luchsinger created this scholarship to express appreciation for the education they received at the University of Minnesota. Wayne earned B.S. (’51), M.S. (’55) and Ph.D. (’56) degrees in agricultural biochemistry, and Sadie earned an associate of arts degree. Wayne was a professor of biochemistry at Arizona State University for 35 years. This scholarship supports new undergraduate students with academic promise and an interest in biochemistry.

Henrietta Novy Miller Scholarship

This scholarship honors Henrietta Miller, who served as administrator of the biochemistry department for nearly 40 years, from 1943 to 1982. Created by alumni, faculty and staff upon her retirement, the scholarship is awarded to outstanding undergraduate students majoring in biochemistry.

Harold Paul Morris Memorial Scholarship

Alumnus Harold Paul Morris, who earned a B.S. in 1925 and a Ph.D. in 1930, had a distinguished career with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Cancer Institute. He received the University of Minnesota Outstanding Alumni Achievement Award in 1970. His son, Emory Morris, established this scholarship to honor his father and support outstanding students pursuing degrees in biochemistry or in genetics and cell biology who have an interest in agriculture, nutrition or health careers.

Richard C. Nelson Memorial Scholarship

Alumnus Richard Nelson, who earned a B.S. in 1934 and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1937, was a biochemistry professor at Northwestern and Ohio State universities, and was successful in industry. His daughter, Sara Nelson Cook, created this scholarship to honor his memory and support high-achieving biochemistry students.

Victor A. Bloomfield Fellowship

Vic Bloomfield was a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics from 1970 to 2011, and served in a variety of leadership roles at the University, including department chair, vice provost for research, associate dean and interim dean of the Graduate School, and associate vice president for public engagement. He created this endowed fund to attract and retain highly talented graduate students who conduct research in structural biology or biophysics.

Paul D. Boyer and James B. Peter Postdoctoral Award in Biochemistry

Established in 1998 by Nobel Laureate Paul Boyer and his former University of Minnesota students, this award recognizes James B. Peter, who was an outstanding postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics. Boyer, who was a biochemistry faculty member from 1945 to 1963, won the 1997 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Ross Gortner Fellowship

Ross Gortner was chairman of the Department of Agricultural Biochemistry at the University of Minnesota from 1917 to 1942. Gortner Laboratories, constructed on the St. Paul Campus in 1967, was named in his honor. Gortner’s former students created this fellowship to support outstanding graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics.

Arnold H. Johnson Fellowship

This fellowship honors the memory of Arnold H. Johnson, who earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of Minnesota in the 1920s and went on to a distinguished career in nutrition and food technology. The fellowship is awarded to graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics who pursue research in nutrition and related areas.

Thomas Reid Award for Innovation and Creativity in Biochemistry

Thomas Reid, who earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of Minnesota in 1943, was instrumental in leading 3M into the pharmaceutical and dentistry businesses. This award funds a graduate student whose research has applications beyond the academic community.

Thomas Reid Fellowship

Thomas Reid created this endowed fund to attract and retain highly talented students to the Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics Graduate Program. The fellowship provides up to five years of funding for students who meet academic standards.

Huber Warner Fellowship in Molecular Biology

Huber Warner was a biochemistry professor and department head at the University of Minnesota from 1964 to 1984, when he left to join the National Institutes of Health, where he held several appointments. In 2004, he returned to CBS to become associate dean for research, a position he held until his retirement in 2010. The fellowship supports graduate students in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics.


Genetics, Cell Biology and Development

Genetics, Cell Biology and Development Undergraduate Scholarship

Designated for students majoring in genetics, cell biology and development, this scholarship is funded by alumnus Carl Barnes, who earned a B.S. degree from CBS in 1992 and went on to graduate from the U of M Medical School. Barnes practices internal medicine in Colorado.

Ray C. Anderson Zoology and Genetics Fellowship

Ray Anderson, who earned a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Minnesota in 1943, established this fellowship to support graduate students conducting research in genetics. Anderson spent three decades as a member of the pediatrics faculty and as a practicing pediatric cardiologist at the U of M Medical School. He retired as emeritus professor of pediatrics in 1980. Anderson was inspired to create this fellowship by his own experience. He received much-needed support from a fellowship during his time as a graduate student.

Ross and Esther Johnson Scholarship

Ross Johnson retired from CBS after a 43 year career as a professor and former head of the Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development. This scholarship provides support to fulltime undergraduate students in CBS that demonstrate an interest in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. Preference will be given to students in the Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development.

Leon A. Snyder Award

Established in 1989 by family, students and friends to honor the memory of Leon Snyder, this award recognizes students with interest and success in a broad range of subjects in addition to the sciences. Snyder joined the University of Minnesota faculty in the 1950s. He taught rigorous genetics courses and co-authored a genetics textbook.


Microbiology

Patrick Cleary Scholarship

Patrick Cleary has been a faculty member in the Department of Microbiology since 1972. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Rochester in New York and served a fellowship at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on the molecular basis of streptococci A disease. Cleary created this scholarship to support microbiology students who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in coursework and research.

Palmer Rogers Microbiology Scholarship

Palmer Rogers was a dedicated professor of microbiology who was beloved by his students and admired by his colleagues. He earned a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1957 and served on the University of Minnesota faculty from 1962 until his retirement in 1999. This scholarship, which honors his dedication to teaching, supports microbiology students who demonstrate exceptional effort. Rogers died in 2002.


Ecology, Evolution and Behavior

Elmer C. and Marcia F. Birney Fellowship

Elmer C. Birney was a professor of ecology, evolution and behavior from 1970 to 2000, and also served as director of graduate studies and curator of mammals for the Bell Museum of Natural History. This fellowship, which recognizes his strong commitment to graduate education, enables talented graduate students to pursue independent, creative research in ecology, evolution or behavior.

Richard and Judi Huempfner Ruffled Grouse, Woodcock and Avian Research Fellowship

Richard Huempfner (M.S. Ecology ’81) is vice president of Advanced Telemetry Systems. The company was founded by researchers who developed radio-tracking at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve during the 1960s. This successful business now provides radio-tracking technology for clients around the world. Richard and Judi established this fellowship to support the work of graduate or undergraduate students who conduct applied research on upland game birds.

Moos Summer Graduate Research Fellowship in Aquatic Biology

This fellowship is funded by the Malcolm Moos Freshwater Society Fund, which was established with a gift from Dr. Daniel and Catherine Moos and matched by the Permanent University Fund in 1988. The fellowship, which honors former University President Malcolm Moos and the Freshwater Society, supports research, education and public information about freshwater issues.

Florence Rothman Fellowship

Russell Rothman, who earned an M.S. in behavioral ecology at the college in 1977, created this fund to honor the memory of his mother, Florence Rothman, who inspired his interest in nature. It supports students in ecology, evolution and behavior, and students at the Bell Museum of Natural History where Russell Rothman studied wolves under the guidance of Elmer Birney, a former curator of mammals.


Itasca

Janet S. Boe Memorial Scholarship at Itasca

This scholarship was established to honor Janet Boe (M.S. Botany ’81) and recognize her passion for the natural world. Boe’s husband, Thomson Soule, created this scholarship in her memory to support students engaged in field research at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories. The field station and the surrounding Itasca State Park were an integral part of Boe’s life. She made many visits to the park over the years, and both she and Soule took classes at the station and eventually wed at Itasca.

Denneth and Joan Dvergsten Itasca Summer Award

This scholarship supports deserving students who take summer research courses at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories.

Itasca Director's Scholarship

Established in 1988, this scholarship recognizes the contributions of the directors of Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories in shaping and advancing the field station as a place for hands-on student research. The scholarship is awarded to students interested in taking summer field research courses at Itasca.

Itasca Graduate Research Fellowship

Robert Megard, a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior from 1962 until his retirement in 2006, taught field biology research at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories. Roberta Megard, a former member of the St. Paul City Council, often accompanied him. Their fellowship supports graduate students who conduct research at Itasca.

William H. Marshall Field Biology Scholarship

William H. Marshall was a professor of entomology, fisheries and wildlife in the former Institute of Agriculture who became director of Itasca Forestry and Biological Station and Laboratories in 1960 and director of Cedar Creek Natural History Area (now Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve) in 1962. When the College of Biological Sciences was formed in 1965, Dean Caldecott named Marshall director of field biology programs. At Itasca, Marshall expanded education and research programs, and raised funds for new buildings. At Cedar Creek, he acquired hundreds of acres of land to expand the preserve and support research on radio-telemetry, prescribed burning and many other areas. Marshall returned to being a professor in the 1970s. He retired in 1996 and died in 2002. This scholarship enables outstanding undergraduate students to take summer field biology courses at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories.

David and Jean Parmelee Scholarship

David Parmelee was director of Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories from 1970 to 1986, and a professor of ecology, evolution and behavior who taught popular courses in ornithology. His wife, Jean, shared his love for Itasca. Their scholarship enables deserving students to participate in the summer session at Itasca.

Ben Thoma Scholarship at Itasca

Ben Thoma first visited Itasca State Park in 1955 as a student for a summer session at the station. Later Ben returned to Itasca State Park as a seasonal park naturalist in the summer months from 1959 to 2003. Living and working at Itasca State Parke were important parts of Ben's life. This scholarship provides support to CBS students taking summer courses at the Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories. Recipients of this award should demonstrate high academic ability as well as financial need.

James C. Underhill Memorial Scholarship

James C. Underhill, who earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Minnesota in 1956, was a faculty member from 1959 until his retirement in 1993. He also served as curator of fishes for the Bell Museum of Natural History, where he continued to work until his death in 2000. As a field biologist, his expertise focused on the ecology of Minnesota’s lakes, rivers and streams, and the fishes that inhabit them. He taught summer field biology courses at Itasca Biological Station and Laboratories for many years and trained numerous Ph.D. students. Underhill co-authored two books about Minnesota fish. His scholarship enables outstanding students to conduct research or take field biology courses at the field station.


Plant Biology

Ernst and Lucy Abbe Award

This award honors the work of Ernest Abbe, former head of the botany department, and his wife, Lucy, a botany researcher and teacher. Ernst Abbe earned a Ph.D. in botany from Harvard University and joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1935, retiring in 1973. He was department head from 1944 to 1947 and 1962 to 1967. The award goes to an outstanding undergraduate who is studying plant sciences and plans to attend graduate school.

Eloise Newcomb Pittman Scholarship

This scholarship honors the memory of Eloise Pittman, an alumna who graduated in the late 1930s with degrees in botany and chemistry, and became a teacher. It is awarded to undergraduate women with interest and ability in the field of plant biology.

Bernard and Jean Phinney Graduate Fellowship in Plant Biology

Bernard Phinney earned his B.A (’40) and Ph.D. (’46) at the University of Minnesota and spent his career as a professor of plant biology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Phinney was a leading researcher whose work provided important insights into how plant hormones control growth. He became a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1985. Phinney died in 2009. This fellowship supports graduate students who employ molecular approaches to study plant biology.

John T. Stout Memorial Scholarship

John (BA Zoology '61; Ph.D. Plant Genetics '72) spent most of his career as a molecular biologist for Asgrow Seed Company (Monsanto). This scholarship supports students interested in plant biology research.

 

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