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PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Forest IsbellForest Isbell

Dr. Isbell investigates how global environmental changes alter plant communities and ecosystem processes. This research bridges and extends previous investigations of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships, biodiversity–stability relationships, nutrient enrichment, land use changes, alternative stable states, and economic valuation of ecosystem services. View his profile on Google Scholar or Research Gate.

 


POSTDOC

Jane CowlesJane Cowles

Jane is interested in extensions of the theoretical links between coexistence mechanisms – the reasons there are so many species to begin with – and the consequences of these coexisting species – biodiversity – for ecosystem functioning. Past projects include examining the role of plant-soil feedbacks in the diversity-productivity relationship and how increased below-ground niche use in diverse plant communities may alter the response of ecosystems to increased temperatures. View her Google Scholar Profile.


GRADUATE STUDENTS

Cristy Portales-ReyesCristy Portales-Reyes

Cristy is interested in understanding the mechanisms that lead to coexistence and maintain high levels of plant diversity. Her current research studies how soil microbial communities respond to nutrient enrichment in grasslands, as well as the role of plant-soil feedbacks in the recovery of biodiversity after perturbations.

 

Kaitlin KimmelKaitlin Kimmel

Kaitlin is interested in studying how anthropogenic factors like climate change and habitat fragmentation influence plant community dynamics. She also hopes to investigate how plants are responding physiologically to these environmental perturbations. Ultimately, she wants to be able to relate these changes in community structure to larger ecosystem-scale functioning in order to look at feedbacks into the system though mathematical modeling techniques.


ALUMNI

Dylan CravenDylan Craven

Dr. Craven was a postdoctoral research fellow in our lab. He currently works with Nico Eisenhauer, based at the Synthesis Centre for Biodiversity Sciences (sDiv) at the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv). Some of his current work considers whether plant diversity can buffer ecosystem processes under perturbations. Visit his website or view his Google Scholar profile.