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Cedar Creek

Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve is a University of Minnesota biological field station with many ecosystems and species found throughout the forests and grasslands of North America. You are now viewing a collection of news, features and opportunities for and about Cedar Creek.

Holey homemakers

Postdoctoral researcher at Cedar Creek organizes a team of contributors to learn more about red-headed woodpeckers, ultimately informing conservation efforts and innovating wildlife research methods.

woodpecker stands on branch beside cavity in tree

Eleanor’s Quilt

Raymond Lindeman made field-shaping discoveries at Cedar Creek. An art project celebrates the role his wife, Eleanor, played.

Eleanor's Quilt

Checking in With Dean Forbes - November 2020


Grim headlines confront us each day as the pandemic continues to take its toll in so many ways. Like many of you, I read the news each day with trepidation. The exponential growth of positive cases of COVID here and in the country as a whole is unsettling. 

Seams of Cedar Creek

Cheri Stockinger sews together the scenes of Cedar Creek through quilts.

Birch bark quilt

Part of Cheri Stockinger's Birch Bark Quilt created during her artist-in-residency at Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve.

A Virtual Visit

With spring field trips curtailed, the field station goes all out to provide K-12 students with resources

A Growing Global Research Footprint

The Nutrient Network continues to expand with new grassland sites internationally and here at home.


In 2019, the Nutrient Network (NutNet) achieved a new milestone — 143 sites on six continents. This summer, more than 40 researchers affiliated with the ecological research network attended the NutNet annual meeting hosted by Ecology, Evolution and Behavior professors Elizabeth Borer and Eric Seabloom. 

Winged Road Warriors

Researchers track migration of monarch butterflies to determine whether roadside milkweed - often laden with salt - can fuel their journey.

Emilie Snell-Rood with monarch

Winter seems like a long ways off, but some are already beginning their migration south. Several thousand monarchs reared on the St. Paul campus are gearing up for their journey to central Mexico.