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Faculty

Faculty in the College of Biological Sciences conduct research on a broad range of subjects, from molecules to ecosystems, and make discoveries that improve human health, restore the environment, provide new sources of renewable energy and enhance agriculture. Here you will find a collection of news, features and opportunities for and about CBS faculty.

Checking in With Dean Forbes -- November 2019


I’m pleased to share the news that we’ve reached our $21 million campaign fundraising goal! We still have work to do to raise funds for specific projects and priorities, but this milestone is an important one because it points to the tremendous community of donors — including a number of faculty and staff — who are passionate about supporting our mission and our students. 

Coping With Toxicity

Plant and Microbial Biology faculty member Jannell Bazurto studies how a bacterium utilizes methanol, despite toxic intermediates. 

Jannell Bazurto

Plants emit oxygen. But that’s not the only chemical they send into the atmosphere. As it turns out, plants release a wide range of chemical compounds that attract pollinators, deter pests and support beneficial microbes.

A Microbe-Driven Meltdown?

A new study will examine how microbial communities living in the snow and ice pack impact glacial melt.

Trinity Hamilton on Glacier at Mt. Hood
Trinity Hamilton conducting field work at Mt. Hood. Photo Credit: Jeff Havig

The Science Behind the Movie: The Lion King

What’s fact and what’s fiction in new live-action Lion King? 

Come find out! CBS Student Services invites CBS students, faculty and staff, join us for a screening of The Lion King (2019) followed by a discussion led by former University of Minnesota Lion Center researcher Dr. Anna Mosser.

Event Details
Thursday, November 21
5:30 - 8:45 p.m.
Coffman Theater, Coffman Memorial Union

No RSVP required.

New grant to decipher how microbes communicate

NIH grant allows Mikael Elias to continue exploring microbial languages.

Mikael Elias

A recent National Institute of Health (NIH) grant for $1.9 million over 5 years will allow Mikael Elias, assistant professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics and a member of the BioTechnology Institute, to continue exploring how bacteria communicate with each other.

Checking in With Dean Forbes - October 2019


I can no longer be in denial - summer is over! Crowded Connector buses, students studying before class, and seminar flyers lining the halls are sure signs that fall semester is in full swing. It’s a busy time for all. While I know our to-do lists are overflowing this time of year, I hope you will all take a few minutes to participate in the forthcoming Employee Engagement Survey. 

A Growing Global Research Footprint

The Nutrient Network continues to expand with new grassland sites internationally and here at home.


In 2019, the Nutrient Network (NutNet) achieved a new milestone — 143 sites on six continents. This summer, more than 40 researchers affiliated with the ecological research network attended the NutNet annual meeting hosted by Ecology, Evolution and Behavior professors Elizabeth Borer and Eric Seabloom.