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Faculty

Faculty in the College of Biological Sciences conduct research on a broad range of subjects, from molecules to ecosystems, and make discoveries that improve human health, restore the environment, provide new sources of renewable energy and enhance agriculture. Here you will find a collection of news, features and opportunities for and about CBS faculty.

Seeking Faculty for CBS Dean's Undergrad Research Opportunities Program


In response to the overwhelming interest in our CBS Dean’s Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunities program, the College plans to offer additional opportunities for both fall 2021 and spring 2022. The CBS Dean’s Office will be providing funds for approximately 20 students per semester to conduct research in faculty labs. Students selected to participate in this program will be paid $15 per hour for up to 20 hours per week for up to 14 weeks each semester. We will be prioritizing CBS students who are rising seniors and have not had a previous research experience.

A Q&A With Laurie Parker

The College’s new associate dean for undergraduate education shares her thoughts on opportunities to enhance the student experience, how to advance diversity, equity and inclusion, and more.

Laurie Parker

Checking in With Dean Forbes -- Summer 2021

Even as we enjoy the long days of summer, fall and a return to campus feel like they are just around the corner. While things won’t be exactly as they were and flexible work will allow greater latitude in how and where we do our jobs, the prospect of connecting in person with students and colleagues is certainly something to look forward to. In the meantime, I have a few updates to share with you.

Ruth Shaw Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Ruth Shaw, a longtime faculty member in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Shaw's work and field-shaping contributions to evolutionary quantitative genetics have influenced many in her own field. 

2021 Stanley Dagley-Samuel Kirkwood and John S. Anderson Leadership Award Recipients Announced

Janet Dubinsky received the 2021 Stanley Dagley-Samuel Kirkwood Undergraduate Education Award and Kit Leffler is the recipient of this year’s John S. Anderson Leadership Award. 

The Stanley-Dagley Samuel Kirkwood Undergraduate Education award goes to a faculty member who has made significant contributions to undergraduate education. As a faculty member, Janet Dubinsky has mentored more than 60 students, developed several undergraduate courses and trained fellow educators on innovative teaching methods and research areas in neuroscience.

Checking in With Dean Forbes - May 2021


The end of an academic year is a time for celebration and reflection. This year is no different despite our altered circumstances. On Saturday, around half of the graduating class will take their assigned seats in 3M Arena at Mariucci and have the opportunity to walk across the stage as their name is called. No faculty or family will be in attendance, but this small step toward normality feels good all the same. As always, our graduates are an inspiration.

Focus on fungi

Two new National Science Foundation grants will allow collaborative teams to disentangle how fungi — dead or alive — move and store carbon in soils.

Oyster mushroom
Photo Credit: Peter Kennedy

Similar to plants vying for the sunniest spot on a window ledge, fungi belowground are competing with each other for nutrients they need to survive. 

Nominate Outstanding Performance Award for Teaching Assistants

Take time to recognize incredible TAs!

Who's eligible? All teaching assistants in CBS courses (undergraduate and graduate) who have demonstrated excellence in teaching or other instructional activities that enhance the educational experience at the U of M are eligible for the annual CBS Outstanding Performance Award for Teaching Assistants.

Please complete the nomination form if you would like to nominate your teaching assistant!

Nominate an outstanding TA

 

Checking in with Dean Forbes - March 2021


A year ago, we found ourselves at the beginning of the pandemic. Classes moved online and uncertainty about the future pervaded our lives. Much has changed in that time and uncertainty remains, but the path forward is clearer and hope for a return to some version of normal seems to be within reach. In the meantime, the work of educating, discovering and engaging continues.