You are here

Faculty

Faculty in the College of Biological Sciences conduct research on a broad range of subjects, from molecules to ecosystems, and make discoveries that improve human health, restore the environment, provide new sources of renewable energy and enhance agriculture. Here you will find a collection of news, features and opportunities for and about CBS faculty.

A Growing Global Research Footprint

The Nutrient Network continues to expand with new grassland sites internationally and here at home.


In 2019, the Nutrient Network (NutNet) achieved a new milestone — 143 sites on six continents. This summer, more than 40 researchers affiliated with the ecological research network attended the NutNet annual meeting hosted by Ecology, Evolution and Behavior professors Elizabeth Borer and Eric Seabloom. 

Checking in With Dean Forbes - September 2019


Welcome back to campus! Summer provides some much-needed breathing room to reflect on accomplishments and make plans for the coming year. I hope your summer provided ample opportunity for both activities. 

Winged Road Warriors

Researchers track migration of monarch butterflies to determine whether roadside milkweed - often laden with salt - can fuel their journey.

Emilie Snell-Rood with monarch

Winter seems like a long ways off, but some are already beginning their migration south. Several thousand monarchs reared on the St. Paul campus are gearing up for their journey to central Mexico.

Failure to Communicate

“Silencing” bacteria may give scientists an antibiotic-free route to controlling infections and balancing the microbiome.

Mikael Elias

New Weapons in the Oak Wilt Wars

Drones, planes and satellites add early detection opportunity to combat the rapid spread of oak wilt.

Oak trees at Cedar Creek

It sounds like something out of a tree horror movie: After spreading silently below the ground from an infected neighbor, a fungus creeps its way up through a tree’s trunk, choking off its lifeblood and eventually killing it.

Plague is not going anywhere

Learning from Soviet Union’s extensive and failed efforts to eradicate plague.


Mention the Black Death and visions of overcrowded 14th-century European cities teaming with rats come to mind. Despite the association of plague with crowded cities the disease didn’t originate there. Plague is caused by a bacterium regularly found in flea and rodent populations across Central Asia’s rural areas, where it first appeared.

Checking in With Dean Forbes - May 2019


This time of year is always a little bittersweet. The frenetic activity of April gives way to the quiet focus of finals week, and of course we will soon bid farewell to a class of newly minted graduates. Later this week well over 400 graduating seniors will walk across the stage at 3M Arena to the loud cheers of their peers, family and friends. It’s an inspiring and emotional experience for all. If you want a sense of the emotions evoked by this annual rite of passage, take a moment to watch this year’s commencement video.

Checking in With Dean Forbes -- April 2019

April is always an incredibly busy time for all as momentum builds toward the culminating event of the year, commencement. This year, I’m pleased to announce that Plant and Microbial Biology Professor George Weiblen will be our speaker. George has achieved so much as a scholar but also in the areas of conservation and community engagement. He will no doubt serve as an inspiration for our soon-to-be graduates.

Back to the Start

Aaron Engelhart and Kate Adamala join NASA-funded team with the aim of finding the origins of life.

NASA

In pondering the big questions of life, few are bigger than, ‘Where did we come from?’ Aaron Engelhart and Kate Adamala are undaunted.