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Research

At the College of Biological Sciences we learn biology by doing biology, and our faculty are on the cutting edge of research and discovery in the field. Here you will find a collection of news, features and opportunities concerning research at CBS.

Seeking Faculty for CBS Dean's Undergrad Research Opportunities Program


In response to the overwhelming interest in our CBS Dean’s Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunities program, the College plans to offer additional opportunities for both fall 2021 and spring 2022. The CBS Dean’s Office will be providing funds for approximately 20 students per semester to conduct research in faculty labs. Students selected to participate in this program will be paid $15 per hour for up to 20 hours per week for up to 14 weeks each semester. We will be prioritizing CBS students who are rising seniors and have not had a previous research experience.

Layered lakes fuel microbial hotspots

Some lakes in the area resemble the iron-rich and stratified ancient oceans, attracting attention from researchers who want to know why.


It should come as no surprise that plentiful lakes draw many researchers to the Itasca region. The fact that some are drawn to lakes because they resemble iron-rich oceans of a bygone era might come as a surprise.

Excuse you, lake

Study points to microbes below lake surfaces as source of nitrogen gases.

Brianna-Loeks-Johnson holds samples

Loeks-Johnson turned a collection of filters left over from sampling lake water into a display that greets visitors to the lab. The colors reflect the variation in the amount of iron, salt, fertilizer and other matter present in the water. Photo: Jonathan Pavlica

Ruth Shaw Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Ruth Shaw, a longtime faculty member in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Shaw's work and field-shaping contributions to evolutionary quantitative genetics have influenced many in her own field. 

Wheelin’ in colored nectar

New grant will allow researchers to better understand the composition of colored plant nectars, with implications for breeding crops and sourcing natural dyes.

Nesocodon mauritianus in bloom with red nectar
Photo credit: Rahul Roy and Clay Carter