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UofM Research Opportunity

Here you will find University of Minnesota research opportunities for College of Biological Sciences undergraduate students.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Genetic Engineering and Synthetic Biology in Crop Plants

Arjun Khakhar, a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Daniel Voytas, is looking for sophomore or junior undergraduate students interested in working on projects that involve cutting edge genetic engineering and synthetic biology in crop plants. This position is for students who are thinking about a research career in biotech/life sciences.

While prior lab experience is a plus, it is by no means required. Students who are accepted will gain skills in:

Borer/Seabloom Laboratory REU

What is the project? 

The successful applicant will join a team that is studying the community ecology of disease. The team will be conducting experiments using a model plant-aphid-virus system. Broadly, they are asking how ecological factors influence the transmission of disease and the resulting communities of pathogens. Ecological factors of interest include the fertilization and diversity of plants, the abundance and diversity of aphid vectors, and potential interactions among viruses within infected hosts.

Work-Study Position: General Laboratory Maintenance for the Mortari Lab

The Mortari Lab performs human tissue engineering and bioprinting research. The lab has a work-study position available for an undergrad student in the College of Biological Sciences or College of Science and Engineering. The position will provide the student with an opportunity to start at the ground-level of a regenerative medicine research laboratory and begin building tangible research skills for their future career.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Fixen Lab

The Fixen lab is working to understand how a photosynthetic bacterium works and how we can get it to work for us by producing energy rich compounds. Students will learn a variety of lab techniques under the supervision of the lab manager and PI and would have the opportunity to take on an independent research project after the first semester. Students will gain experience in molecular biology approaches such as cloning and qPCR and in growing microorganisms using sterile technique under anaerobic conditions. Volunteer, directed research, and UROP options are possible. 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Hayden Lab

The Hayden Lab studies how our decision-making hardware (our brains) compare different options and chooses the most rewarding ones. We record the activity of single neurons during real choices in order to parcel out the contributions of frontal lobe structures to reward-based choices. More information about the work of the Hayden Lab can be found at haydenlab.com.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity: The Mono Project

The Mono Project, part of the University of Minnesota Clinical Virology Lab, is dedicated to learning how Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes disease and developing a vaccine against it. Currently, the Mono Project is looking for undergraduate student volunteers that are passionate about public health, vaccine development, and clinical research. More information about the research conducted by the Mono Project can be found at z.umn.edu/ebvdiseases.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Mashek Lab

The Mashek lab is seeking several undergraduate students to help with general laboratory duties and to assist in various ongoing projects.  These duties include, but are not limited to: making solutions, RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, real-time PCR, protein assays, Western blotting, cell culture, mouse genotyping, etc.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Sobeck Lab

The Sobeck laboratory aims at analyzing the roles of proteins called "tumor suppressors". These proteins play crucial roles in our cells to prevent cancer susceptibility by protecting our cells' chromosomes from accumulating damage. We are focused on the members of the so-called Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway that are involved in a number of childhood cancers. Currently we have an exciting project that explores a new role for the FA pathway in telomere maintenance.