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Renewing a transatlantic partnership

The University of Minnesota, University of Oslo and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences renew agreement on Norwegian Centennial Chair program.

Norwegian Centennial Chair

For more than a decade, researchers at the University of Minnesota have built connections and collaborated with peers across the Atlantic through the

Research Opportunity in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology

The Balfour Lab is recruiting incoming sophomores to volunteer in its research lab. The lab is looking for individuals that are passionate about public health, virology, vaccine development, infectious disease and clinical research. Experience in clinical or research labs is preferred. 

University of Minnesota Medical School - SNMA Mentorship Program

The Student National Medical Association (SNMA) Mentorship Program is now accepting applications for the 2019-2020 school year! As an organization, one of SNMA's goals is to support students as they pursue their medical education. The mentorship program pairs current medical students with pre-medical students to offer support and advice throughout the medical school application process.

Failure to Communicate

“Silencing” bacteria may give scientists an antibiotic-free route to controlling infections and balancing the microbiome.

Mikael Elias

New Weapons in the Oak Wilt Wars

Drones, planes and satellites add early detection opportunity to combat the rapid spread of oak wilt.

Oak trees at Cedar Creek

It sounds like something out of a tree horror movie: After spreading silently below the ground from an infected neighbor, a fungus creeps its way up through a tree’s trunk, choking off its lifeblood and eventually killing it.

Plague Is Not Going Anywhere

Learning from Soviet Union’s extensive and failed efforts to eradicate plague.


Mention the Black Death and visions of overcrowded 14th-century European cities teaming with rats come to mind. Despite the association of plague with crowded cities the disease didn’t originate there. Plague is caused by a bacterium regularly found in flea and rodent populations across Central Asia’s rural areas, where it first appeared.